What Is The Basic Function Of The Nervous System

What Is The Basic Function Of The Nervous System – Sensory – collects information Integrated/combined – information is combined to respond to a stimulus Motor – signals, responds to homeostasis

Peripheral Nervous System (PNS): Nerves and ganglia of the body — includes 31 pairs of spinal nerves — and 12 pairs of cranial nerves

What Is The Basic Function Of The Nervous System

What Is The Basic Function Of The Nervous System

4 Neuron Mass of nerve cell that transmits information Communication 1. Cell body – contains nucleus and two extensions 2. Dendrite – smaller, more numerous, receives information 3. Axon – sends information

Sympathetic Nervous System: Definition, Function & Examples

Myelin Sheaths – These act as insulation around axon Schwann cells providing myelin for peripheral neurons. Oligodendrocytes myelinate axons in the central nervous system.

Longevity – can live and function for life Do not divide – embryonic neurons lose ability to undergo mitosis; Neural stem cells have an exceptionally high metabolic rate – needing large amounts of oxygen and glucose. Neonatal nerve fibers are unmyelinated – resulting in their response to stimuli being blunted and sometimes involving the whole body.

14 A nerve impulse speed is proportional to the diameter of the axon. Larger diameter = faster speed **Myelinated axons conduct faster than unmyelinated axons** Why do you think?

Nerve Pathway – Nerve impulse travels from neuron to neuron dendrite → cell body → along axon -> synapse → dendrite

Human Nervous System

18 Neurotransmitters Excitatory – increases membrane permeability, increases probability of achieving threshold Inhibitory – decreases membrane permeability, decreases probability of achieving threshold

Acetylcholine – stimulates muscle contraction Monoamines – norepinephrine and dopamine (feel good, low levels = depression) Serotonin – sleepiness and mood

Can be produced from exercise. The name “endorphin” comes from endo- and -orphin; “Intended to refer to a morphine-like substance produced from within the body. Example – “runner’s high”

What Is The Basic Function Of The Nervous System

21 Nerve Pathways Reflex arc = simple pathway, involves only a few neurons (involuntary, instantaneous) Knee-jerk reflex = maintains uprightness Withdrawal reflex = avoidance of painful stimuli

What Is The Nervous System?

In order to operate this website, we log user data and share it with processors. To use this website, you must agree to our Privacy Policy, including the Cookie Policy The image you remember of your nervous system probably includes the brain, the nervous tissue within the cranium, and the spinal cord, an extension of the nerves. Tissue within the vertebral column. Additionally, the nervous tissue that extends from the brain and spinal cord to the rest of the body (nerves) is also part of the nervous system. We can anatomically divide the nervous system into two main regions: the central nervous system (CNS) is the brain and spinal cord, the peripheral nervous system (PNS) is the nerves (Figure 12.1.1). The brain is contained within the cranial cavity of the skull and the vertebral canal of the spinal cord. The peripheral nervous system is so named because it is in the periphery—meaning outside the brain and spinal cord.

Figure 12.1.1 – Central and Peripheral Nervous System: CNS contains brain and spinal cord, PNS contains nerves.

Apart from the anatomical divisions listed above, the nervous system can also be divided based on its functions. The nervous system is involved in receiving information about the environment around us (sensory function, sensation) and creating a response to that information (motor function, feedback) and combining the two (integration).

. Sensation refers to receiving information about the environment, either what is happening outside (eg: heat from the sun) or inside the body (eg: heat from muscle activity). These sensations are known as stimuli (singular = stimuli) and different sensory receptors are responsible for detecting different stimuli. Sensory information travels to the CNS via PNS nerves in specific sections known as afferent (sensory) branches of the PNS. When information originates from sensory receptors in the skin, skeletal muscles, or joints, it is transmitted to the CNS using somatic sensory neurons; When information originates from sensory receptors in blood vessels or internal organs, it is transmitted to the CNS using visceral sensory neurons.

Nervous System Anatomy And Physiology: Video

A sensory stimulus causes the nervous system to produce a response in an effector organ (such as a muscle or gland). The motor (efferent) branch of the PNS carries signals from the CNS to the effector organs. When the effector organ is a skeletal muscle, the neuron carrying the information is called a somatic motor neuron; When the effector organ is cardiac or smooth muscle or glandular tissue, the neuron carrying the information is called an autonomic motor neuron. Voluntary responses are controlled by somatic motor neurons, and involuntary responses are controlled by autonomic motor neurons, which are discussed in the next section.

. Stimuli detected by sensory structures are communicated to the nervous system where the information is processed. In the CNS, information from certain stimuli is compared, or integrated, with information from other stimuli or memories of previous stimuli. Then, a motor neuron is activated to initiate a response from the effector limb. The process during which sensory information is processed and a motor response is produced is called integration (see Figure 12.1.2 below).

Figure 12.1.2 – Functioning of the nervous system: Integration occurs in the CNS where sensory information from the periphery is processed and interpreted. The CNS then produces a motor plan that is executed by the efferent branches serving the effector organs.

What Is The Basic Function Of The Nervous System

The nervous system can be divided into sections based on anatomy and physiology. The anatomical divisions are central and peripheral nervous system. The CNS is the brain and spinal cord. The PNS is everything else and consists of afferent and efferent branches with further subdivisions for somatic, visceral and autonomic functions. Functionally, the nervous system can be divided into regions that are responsible for sensation, those responsible for integration, and those responsible for generating responses.

Autonomic Nervous System (ans): What It Is And How It Works

1. What response is produced by the nervous system when you run on a treadmill? Include an example of each type of tissue under the control of the nervous system.

2. During food intake, which anatomical and functional divisions of the nervous system are involved in the perceptual experience?

Functional division of the efferent branch of the PNS responsible for the control of cardiac and smooth muscle, as well as glandular tissue

The major organ of the central nervous system is contained within the cranium and is continuous with the spinal cord

Associate Degree Nursing Physiology Review

The anatomical division of the nervous system that extends from the brain and spinal cord to the rest of the body

Nervous system activity that produces an event in a target tissue (muscle or gland) as a result of a stimulus

The function of the nervous system that receives information from the environment and translates it into electrical signals in nerve tissue

What Is The Basic Function Of The Nervous System

The functional division of the nervous system that is concerned with conscious perception, voluntary movement, and skeletal muscle reflexes

Funtions Of Neurons

The organ of the central nervous system is found within the spinal cavity and is connected to the periphery through spinal nerves; Reflexes mediate behavior

This work, Anatomy and Physiology, adapted from Anatomy and Physiology by Stax, is licensed under CC BY. This version, including modified content and artwork, is licensed under CC BY-SA, unless otherwise noted.

Anatomy and Physiology Copyright © 2019 Lindsay M. Biga, Stacey Bronson, Sierra Dawson, Amy Harwell, Robin Hopkins, Joel Kaufman, Mike LeMaster, Phillip Mattern, Katie Morrison-Graham, Kristen Oja, Devon Quick, John OSU, Ossur and Stax are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International License , where not otherwise noted. function of integrating and correlating sensory information; creates thoughts, perceptions, and emotions; form and store memory; Controls most of the anatomy and movement of the body

2) Peripheral Nervous System (PNS) – consists of spinal nerves, cranial nerves and ganglia. Functions of carrying messages from the spinal cord and brain

Nervous System I

Nerve fiber – a general term for any neuronal process Nerve – is a bundle of many nerve fibers along the same pathway in the PNS surrounded by a connective tissue layer. Ganglia – a cluster of nerve cell bodies in the PNS nucleus – a mass of cell bodies and dendrites in the CNS tract – a bundle of nerve fibers along the same path in the CNS without a connective tissue layer. White matter – collection of myelinated processes from many neurons Gray matter – consists of either neuron cell bodies, dendrites and axon terminals, or unmyelinated axons and neuroglia

1. Afferent – ​​transmits sensory impulses from the PNS to the CNS. – Sensory afferent fibers – carry impulses from skin, skeletal muscles and joints – Visceral afferent fibers – transmit impulses from visceral organs 2. Efferent – transmits motor impulses from CNS to PNS – Somatic nervous system – provides conscious control of skeletal muscles – Autonomic system – Regulates smooth muscle, cardiac muscle and glands

3. Association neurons or interneurons All other neurons are termed as association neurons or interneurons which are responsible for integrating afferent information and generating an effective response to include higher cognitive functions.

What Is The Basic Function Of The Nervous System

Four types of neuroglia are found in the CNS: 1. Astrocytes – star-shaped with many processes, participate in neurotransmitter metabolism, maintain proper K+ balance, help

Autonomic Nervous System: What It Is, Function & Disorders

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