Examples Of Tissues In The Human Body

Examples Of Tissues In The Human Body – The term tissue is used to describe groups of cells found together in the body. Cells within a tissue share a common embryonic origin. Microscopic observation reveals that the cells in a tissue share morphological characteristics and are arranged in a systematic pattern that achieves the functions of the tissue. From an evolutionary perspective, tissues appear in more complex organisms. For example, in multicellular protists, ancient eukaryotes, cells are not organized into tissues.

Although there are many types of cells in the human body, they are organized into four broad classes of tissues: epithelial, connective, muscle, and nervous. Each of these categories is characterized by specific functions that contribute to the overall health and maintenance of the body. Disruption of the structure is a sign of injury or disease. Such changes can be detected through microscopic studies of histology, tissue appearance, organization and function.

Examples Of Tissues In The Human Body

Examples Of Tissues In The Human Body

Epithelial tissue, also called epithelium, refers to the sheets of cells that cover the body’s outer surfaces, line internal cavities and passages, and form certain glands. Connective tissue, as the name implies, binds the cells and organs of the body together and functions in the protection, support and integration of all parts of the body. Muscle tissue is excitable, responds to stimuli and contracts to provide movement, and occurs as three major types: skeletal (voluntary) muscle, smooth muscle, and cardiac muscle in the heart. Nervous tissue is also stimulated, which allows the transmission of electrochemical signals in the form of nerve impulses that communicate between different areas of the body ([link]).

Adipose Tissue (human Anatomy): Image, Functions, Diseases And Treatments

The next level of organization is the organ, where many types of tissue work together to form a functional unit. Just as knowing the structure and function of cells helps you study tissue, a knowledge of tissue helps you understand how organs work. Epithelial and connective tissues are discussed in detail in this chapter. Muscle and nervous tissue will be discussed only briefly in this chapter.

Four types of tissue are exemplified by nervous tissue, stratified squamous epithelial tissue, cardiac muscle tissue, and connective tissue in the small intestine. Clockwise from nerve tissue, LM × 872, LM × 282, LM × 460, LM × 800. (Micrograph provided by the Regents of the University of Michigan Medical School © 2012)

A zygote, or fertilized egg, is a single cell formed by the fusion of an egg and a sperm. After fertilization the zygote undergoes a rapid mitotic cycle, producing many cells to form an embryo. The first embryonic cells to arise have the ability to differentiate into any type of cell in the body and, as such, are called totipotent, meaning each has the ability to divide, differentiate, and develop into a new organism. As cell proliferation progresses, three major cell lineages are established within the embryo. As explained in a later chapter, each of these lineages of embryonic cells form distinct germ layers from which all the tissues and organs of the human body eventually form. Each germ layer is identified by its relative position: ectoderm (ecto- = “outer”), mesoderm (meso- = “middle”), and endoderm (endo- = “inner”). [link] shows the types of tissues and organs associated with each of the three germ layers. Note that epithelial tissue originates in all three layers, while nervous tissue is derived primarily from ectoderm and muscle tissue from mesoderm.

Check out this slideshow to learn more about stem cells. How do somatic stem cells differ from embryonic stem cells?

Epithelial Tissue: What Is It, Where It’s Found, And More

A tissue membrane is a thin layer or sheet of cells that lines the exterior of the body (for example, the skin), organs (for example, the pericardium), internal passages leading to the exterior of the body (for example, the abdominal mesenteries), and the lining of movable joint cavities. There are two basic types of tissue membranes: connective tissue and epithelial membranes ([link]).

The two major classes of tissue membranes in the body are (1) connective tissue membranes, which include synovial membranes, and (2) epithelial membranes, which include mucous membranes, serous membranes, and dermal membranes, in other words skin.

Connective tissue membrane is made up of only connective tissue. These membranes cover organs like the kidneys and line our movable joints. A synovial membrane is a type of connective tissue membrane that lines the cavity of a freely moving joint. For example, synovial membranes surround the shoulder, elbow, and knee joints. Fibroblasts in the inner layer of the synovial membrane release hyaluronan into the joint cavity. Hyaluronan effectively traps available water to form synovial fluid, a natural lubricant that enables the bones of the joint to move freely against each other without much friction. This synovial fluid easily exchanges water and nutrients with all body fluids such as blood.

Examples Of Tissues In The Human Body

Epithelial membranes are made of epithelium attached to layers of connective tissue, for example, your skin. Mucous membrane is also a combination of connective and epithelial tissues. Sometimes called mucosa, these epithelial membranes line body cavities and hollow passages that open to the external environment, and include the digestive, respiratory, excretory, and reproductive tracts. Mucus, produced by epithelial exocrine glands, covers the epithelial layer. The underlying connective tissue, called the lamina propria (literally “own layer”), helps support the fragile epithelial layer.

Connective Tissue Connects Organs And Tissues Together.,

A serous membrane is an epithelial membrane formed from a mesodermally derived epithelium called mesothelium that is supported by connective tissue. These membranes line the body’s coelomic cavities, that is, those cavities that do not open to the outside, and they cover the organs within those cavities. They are essentially membranous sacs, with mesothelium on the inside and connective tissue on the outside. The serous fluid secreted by the cells of the thin squamous mesothelium lubricates the membrane and reduces friction and friction between the organs. Serous membranes are identified by location. Three serous membranes line the thoracic cavity; Two pleura covering the lungs and pericardium covering the heart. The fourth, the peritoneum, is the serous membrane in the abdominal cavity that covers the abdominal organs and forms the double sheets of mesenteries that suspend the many digestive organs.

Skin is an epithelial membrane also known as dermis. It is a stratified squamous epithelial membrane that rests on top of connective tissue. The apical surface of this membrane is exposed to the external environment and is covered with dead, keratinized cells that help protect the body from odors and pathogens.

The human body contains more than 200 types of cells that can all be classified into four types of tissue: epithelial, connective, muscle, and nervous. Epithelial tissues act as a covering that controls the movement of material across the surface. Connective tissue integrates different parts of the body and provides support and protection to the organs. Muscle tissue allows the body to move. Nerve tissue propagates information.

The study of the size and arrangement of cells in tissue is called histology. All cells and tissues in the body are derived from three germ layers in the embryo: ectoderm, mesoderm, and endoderm.

Types Of Tissues

Different types of tissues form membranes that surround organs, provide friction-free interaction between organs, and hold organs together. Synovial membranes are connective tissue membranes that protect and line joints. Epithelial membranes are made of epithelial tissue attached to a layer of connective tissue. There are three types of epithelial membranes: mucous, which contains glands; serous, which secretes fluid; and skins to be made into leather.

The four types of tissues in the body are epithelial, connective, muscle, and nervous. Epithelial tissue is made up of layers of cells that cover the body surfaces that make up the outside world, line internal cavities and glands. Connective tissue binds the cells and organs of the body together and performs many functions, especially in protecting, supporting and integrating the body. Muscle tissue, which responds to stimuli and contracts to provide movement, is divided into three major types: skeletal (voluntary) muscle, smooth muscle, and cardiac muscle in the heart. Nerve tissue allows the body to receive signals and transmit information in the form of electrical impulses from one area of ​​the body to another.

The zygote is described as totipotent because it eventually gives rise to all the cells in your body, including the highly specialized cells of your nervous system. Describe this transition, discussing the steps and processes that lead to these particular cells.

Examples Of Tissues In The Human Body

The zygote divides into several cells. When these cells become specialized, they lose the ability to differentiate into all tissues. Initially they form three primary germ layers. Following the cells of the ectodermal germ layer, they are also more restricted in what they can make. Eventually, some of these ectodermal cells become more restricted and differentiate into nerve cells.

The Organization And Structure Of The Human Body

Synovial membrane is a type of connective tissue membrane that supports mobility in joints. The membrane lines the joint cavity and contains fibroblasts that produce hyaluronan, which leads to the production of synovial fluid, a natural lubricant that enables the bones of the joint to move freely against each other.

The skin; Composed of a stratified epithelial tissue

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